Law and Ethics (Article)

R0:5ad410ba3fa0191312506cf94754bfd9-Addressing Ethical Dilemmas in AI: Listening to Engineers

Addressing Ethical Dilemmas in AI: Listening to Engineers

Documentation is key – design decisions in AI development must be documented in detail, potentially taking inspiration from the field of risk management. There is a need to develop a framework for large-scale testing of AI effects, beginning with public tests of AI systems, and moving towards real-time validation and monitoring. Governance frameworks for decisions in AI development need to be clarified, including the questions of post-market surveillance of product or system performance. Certification of AI ethics expertise would be helpful to support professionalism in AI development teams. Distributed responsibility should be a goal, resulting in a clear definition of roles and responsibilities as well as clear incentive structures for taking in to account broader ethical concerns in the development of AI systems. Spaces for discussion of ethics are lacking and very necessary both internally in companies and externally, provided by independent organisations. Looking to policy ensuring whistleblower protection and ombudsman position within companies, as well as participation from professional organisations. One solution is to look to the existing EU RRI framework and to ensure multidisciplinarity in AI system development team composition. The RRI framework can provide systematic processes for engagement with stakeholders and ensuring that problems are better defined. The challenges of AI systems point to a general lack in engineering education. We need to ensure that technical disciplines are empowered to identify ethical problems, which requires broadening technical education programs to include societal concerns. Engineers advocate for public transparency of adherence to standards and ethical principles for AI-driven products and services to enable learning from each other’s mistakes and to foster a no-blame culture.

R0_b6959f4e35b2c24097cf630fa7cea606-Evaluating and Characterizing Human Rationales

Evaluating and Characterizing Human Rationales

Two main approaches for evaluating the quality of machine-generated rationales are: 1) using human rationales as a gold standard; and 2) automated metrics based on how rationales affect model behavior.

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COCIR analyses application of medical device legislation to Artificial Intelligence

“The European Commission has shown its ambition in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) in its recent White Paper on Artificial Intelligence – a European approach to excellence and trust. This White Paper is at the same time a precursor of possible legislation of AI in products and services in the European Union. However, COCIR sees no need for novel regulatory frameworks for AI-based devices in Healthcare, because the requirements of EU MDR and EU IVDR in combination with GDPR are adequate to ensure that same excellence and trust.” (COCIR paper).

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Disposable Identities are Elemental(s) in IoT

Rob wants to argue that if intent is linked to an incorrect assessment of identity, and thus not central to an ethics of behaviour, then this opens up an actionable set of actors actually at play in the digtial (IoT, 5G, AI) namely: objects (with added connectivity like NFC), machines with built in connectivity, animals & plants (as ecosystems) and humans alike , as they can be treated as entities.

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Montreal AI Ethics Institute: Response to the European Commission’s white paper on AI

In February 2020, the European Commission (EC) published a white paper entitled, On Artificial Intelligence – A European approach to excellence and trust. This paper outlines the EC’s policy options for the promotion and adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in the European Union. We reviewed this paper and published a response addressing the EC’s plans to build an “ecosystem of excellence” and an “ecosystem of trust,” as well as the safety and liability implications of AI, the internet of things (IoT), and robotics.

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Covid-19 and contact tracing apps

Multi-presenter format with exciting Speakers from the current European ICT research projects AI4EU (www.ai4eu.eu) and Helios (helios-social.com/) as well as Guest Speakers.

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Cumplimiento normativo y seguridad TI en IoT

La conectividad y el tratamiento masivo de datos son dos pilares esenciales para el desarrollo de estos sistemas, los cuales, a su vez, introducen riesgos de seguridad y privacidad que deben ser tratados adecuadamente.